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Structuring Emails...

 

Step One:

Email Subject Line

 

Step Two:
Email Greeting & Introduction

 

Step Three:
Email Body & Call to Action

 

Step Four:

Email Sign Off & Signature

 



Home >> Email Writing >> How to structure an email >> How to write an email sign off and signature

 

Step Four: How to Write an Email Sign Off and Signature

 

Ending an email correctly is just as important as starting one correctly

 

We all know the importance of making a good first impression, but fewer people talk about the importance of making a good parting impression.

 

There’s a theory in psychology known as the peak-end rule, which states that people judge experiences on how they were at their peak (i.e. their most intense or important point) and at their end, rather than the sum total of every element of the experience.

 

In terms of email, the most important part (the peak) will be one of the following:

 

• If the other person is expecting the email, the peak is the information they need/they’ve been waiting for.
• If the other person isn’t expecting the email, the peak is the call to action.

 

In either case, the end is….well, the end; the sign off and email signature. These are constants in every message.

 

The sign off is your farewell. It’s the very last line that you type towards the end of your email. It is, in effect, the last thing you ‘say’ to the recipient. As the last part of the email that’s actually written by you, it plays a big part in the overall impression your message gives.

 

The signature is the digital equivalent of the sender’s name at the bottom of a hand-written letter.

 

How well you craft these two elements of your email sign off can make or break the effectiveness of your message.

 

The kind of farewell and signature you use will depend on whether your email is for personal or business use.

 

 

 

Personal email

 

If you know the person well

 

 

 

If you don’t know the person well

 

If the tone of your email is upbeat

 

If the tone of your email is serious

 

 

Farewell

  • Cheers
  • Speak soon
  • All the best
  • Thanks a lot
  • Many thanks
  • Write soon
  • Best regards
  • Kind regards
  • I hope to hear from you
  • I look forward to hearing from you

 

  • Kind regards
  • Best regards
  • Many thanks
  • I hope to hear from you
  • Kind regards
  • Best regards
  • Sincerely

Signature

Your first name only

 

Your first name only

Your full name

 

 

 

 

Business email

 

If you know the person well

 

If you don’t know the person well

 

If the tone of your email is upbeat

If the tone of your email is serious

 

If the tone of your email is upbeat (i.e. a promotional email)

If the tone of your email is serious

Farewell

  • All the best
  • Many thanks
  • Best regards
  • Kind regards
  • I hope to hear from you soon
  • I look forward to hearing from you
  • Regards
  • Sincerely
  • Best regards
  • Kind regards
  • I look forward to your response
  • I eagerly await your response
  • I hope to hear from you soon

 

  • Kind regards
  • Best regards
  • I/We hope to hear from you
  • I/We look forward to hearing
  • from you
  • I/We hope to see you soon
  • I’ll/We’ll see you there

 

  • Regards
  • Best regards
  • Kind regards
  • Sincerely

Signature

Approved business signature

 

 

If you’re creating an email signature for business use, this should include the following information.

 

Mandatory

Optional

 

Full name

 

Organisation’s logo

Job title

Organisation’s postal address

Organisation name

Mobile number

Direct phone number/switchboard number

Social media links

Email address

 

 

 

Most organisations will have a pre-approved email signature, which may also include important legal disclaimers. Make sure to use these if they’re available.

 

It can be a good idea to customise your email settings so that your signature is only attached to outgoing emails. Otherwise every time you reply to an email you’ll find your signature is re-attached. In a long email chain – especially when a lot of short messages are flying back and forth – this gets awkward. You’ll start to find your emails become 10% content and 90% signature.

 

 

Click here for a visual example:

Email writing Signature example

 

 

Looks weird huh?

 

So, in summary, make sure you practice good email etiquette by using an email sign off that matches the overall tone of your message and is appropriately formal (or informal) for your recipient.

 

Whether your email is personal or work-related, cheerful or serious, the correct farewell and signature will still leave a positive lasting impression.

 

 

 

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